Quiet Time

Taking time to listen to life

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I try to find the positive in everything, and the coronavirus situation has given me things to be thankful for, like working my job around my everyday life instead of the other way around.  Although instead of  Purple Shirt Thursdays at work, I now have Batman Pajamas Thursdays at home.

A couple of us held out working in the office until our governor proclaimed it was breaking the law, since we were considered a “non-essential” business.  So, we packed up our monitors and other equipment and hooked them up at home.  Two days of help-desk calls later, I’m fortunate to have eight hours’ worth of work that can be done at home daily.  At least for now.

Normally, it’s not uncommon for me to run a load of wash in the morning (before work), get it out and put it in the dryer after work, and then take it out a couple of days later when sadly, ironing becomes a necessity instead of an option. Working from home means I can wash and dry in one morning.  Changing out of what I slept in – now that’s optional.  

Our refrigerator has never been so full.  I’ve never cooked so much, so willingly.  It makes a huge difference when I have time throughout the day to slice up vegetables, pick apart a pot roast, and throw it all together in time for a vegetable soup dinner for my essential-worker boyfriend and me. It’s also been a good time to use up those oddball things in the cupboards like almond butter and rhubarb spread, and put cookbook recipes to use that I’ve been meaning to try for years.  

While I’m able to make the best of the crazy pandemic situation we all find ourselves in, the medical industry is facing hard choices.  Hospitals are forced to prioritize surgeries.  I know someone who found out her breast cancer surgery didn’t count as urgent surgery.  She’s taking hormone pills to, hopefully, shrink the cancer in the meantime.  Surgery might be rescheduled for late Spring.

As I write this, it’s the early stages of being away from the office and practicing social distancing.  Sometime in the next weeks or months, we’ll get back to business as usual.  Before we know it, stress and deadlines will have coworkers grumbling at each other, printers will be pumping out important documents, the backup warning beep of forklifts and trucks will echo throughout warehouses and construction sites.  It reminds me that the best part of all this isolation just may be the quiet.

I don’t miss the constant assault on my auditory senses.  No basketballs bouncing in the neighborhood.  Only an  occasional car drives past.  Flights have certainly decreased as I rarely hear them fly overhead.  How rare such silence is.  And I kind of like it. So much so, that I found that I pay closer attention to things like the sound of bacon sizzling while I’m cooking.  I notice the whir of the refrigerator and ceiling fan.  Those are all the noises I want to hear.